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Today, my little sister who has been deaf since she was born started screaming and jumping in joy. When I signed to her, “What happened?” she started signing back the lyrics from the song on Pandora that I had playing softly in the family room. She can suddenly hear, and we’ve been at the doctor’s office all afternoon trying to figure how this miracle happened. MMT

#17359 (5) - Jan 28, 2013 by jelly - Happy - Yes, that made me think too! (1386) - No, that made me sleepy. (54)


Comments

 

Yeah, because someone who was born deaf can suddenly recognize words in a song when they can't see the singer's mouth... seems legit. I don't doubt that the girl could suddenly hear, but it'd be simply impossible for her to understand what she's hearing if she's never been able to hear before.

I agree with Anoulie. If she's been deaf since birth she wouldn't be able to just pick up all of the words like that without visual help. I hope this story is true, because it would be great for that little girl. But it's a little exaggerated, at the least, if not completely fabricated.

Many children, even those born deaf, can retain some residual hearing just like many who are considered legally blind still retain some semblance of sight.

Rarely is a deaf person completely deaf, even if they were born that way, and many deaf people do not even use sign language because they rely on their residual hearing with hearing technology to compensate for the loss, while many families of people with only mild hearing loss embrace the deaf culture and adopt sign language as their primary form of communication. Without knowing the degree to which this person could hear without technology (meaning hearing aids or cochlear implants), the age at which they became deaf or hearing impaired (many people acquire hearing loss later in life and have had access to sound for many years before they became deaf), and the cause (if known) of their hearing loss, it would be impossible to determine the extent of their previous knowledge of music. Therefore, nothing is "impossible". Let's give this wonderful, cheerful family the benefit of the doubt and congratulate them on their family member's improvement.

Sorry about the previous post - we know the child was diagnosed at birth. Everything I said is still true, but ignore this comment "the age at which they became deaf or hearing impaired (many people acquire hearing loss later in life and have had access to sound for many years before they became deaf), as it is not relevant in this case.

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